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ABOUT

Underwood Caravan Park is a secluded caravan site with 5 pitches with car parking, nestled close to the banks of the Forth and Clyde Canal which runs from Bowling to Edinburgh. With beautiful views over the fields making an idyllic location yet within a short distance there is a lovely selection of restaurants to choose from and there is a pub 1 mile away which also does food. With the Forth and Clyde Canal running alongside the site, the footpath is great for a cycle or a leisurely walk.

For the more energetic, it also provides a safe route with no traffic to worry about, to Edinburgh heading East or Glasgow to the West by cycle and makes for lovely day out. Many other attractions are easily reached from the site including the world-famous Kelpies which stand 30 metres high, impressive pieces of art which should not be missed.

There are also a selection of local shops, the nearest of which is just over 1 mile away.

THINGS TO DO

The Kelpies are the largest equine sculptures in the world. Located between Falkirk and Grangemouth, it was created as a space for the communities in the Falkirk area to come together. The Kelpies go a step further in bringing together not only people from different parts of Scotland and the UK, but from all over the world.

Standing 30 metres (100ft) tall, The Kelpies stand majestically above all around them and pay homage to the working horses of Scotland which used to pull barges along Scotland’s canals and worked in the fields in the area where they now stand. Towering over a new canal extension which links the Forth & Clyde Canal to the North Sea, The Kelpies are the result of a unique collaboration between the partners and Glasgow-based artist Andy Scott. Almost a decade in the making, the project has transformed 350 hectares of underused land between Falkirk and Grangemouth into a vibrant parkland, visitor attraction and marine hub with the canal and The Kelpies at its heart.

Grab a bite to eat or a souvenir of your visit in the Horsebox, get up close with The Kelpies Tour, or enjoy all the activities The Helix has to offer.

The Falkirk Wheel is a rotating boat lift in central Scotland, connecting the Forth and Clyde Canal with the Union Canal. The lift is named after Falkirk, the town in which it is located. It reconnects the two canals for the first time since the 1930s.

The Falkirk Wheel is the world’s only rotating boatlift, which is used to connect the Forth & Clyde and Union canals in central Scotland.

The Falkirk Wheel is a magnificent, mechanical marvel which has been constructed to 21st century, state-of-the-art engineering. It is already being recognised as an iconic landmark worthy of Scotland’s traditional engineering expertise.

Designed to replace a series of lock gates built in the 19th century – long since demolished and replaced by housing – The Falkirk Wheel is the showpiece of the Millennium Link project where coast-to-coast navigation of the canals has been re-established for the first time in over 40 years.

Rough Castle Fort is a Roman fort on the Antonine Wall roughly 2 kilometres south-east of Bonnybridge near Tamfourhill in the Falkirk council area, Scotland. It is owned by the National Trust for Scotland.

Antonine Wall, Rough Castle fort is the second smallest on the wall, however, it is easily the best-preserved and offers the most spectacular and memorable views of the surviving Roman remains. Here you can see an excellent example of the Antonine Wall ditch, the tallest-surviving portion of rampart, defensive lilia pits to the north of the wall, and easily identifiable fort and annexe defences, including multiple ditches and gateways. This is the best site to gain an impression of how the frontier and its integral forts worked.

Rough Castle is signposted at Bonnybridge, and then along a quiet side road from the B816 between Bonnybridge and High Bonnybridge. There is a small car park at the end of this road. Alternatively, park at the Falkirk Wheel, then follow the signposted path up from the visitor centre, a walk of about 15 minutes.

The John Muir Way is a 215-kilometre continuous long distance route in southern Scotland, running from Helensburgh, Argyll and Bute in the west to Dunbar, East Lothian in the east.

The John Muir Way is a 215-kilometre (130 mi) continuous long distance route in southern Scotland, running from Helensburgh, Argyll and Bute in the west to Dunbar, East Lothian in the east. It is named in honour of the Scottish conservationist John Muir, who was born in Dunbar in 1838 and became a founder of the United States National Park Service. The route provides a coast-to-coast route across Scotland, linking Muir's birthplace with Scotland's first national park, Loch Lomond and The Trossachs, and Helensburgh, from where he left Scotland for the United States. It is suitable for walkers and cyclists.

The Helix has been around since 2003, born from an idea to create a local greenspace that connects and engages with its local communities. We’d like to think that we’ve come a long way since then, and made some great achievements in that time. Take a look at some of our achievements below.

The Helix has been around since 2003, borne from an idea to create a local urban green space that connects and engages with its local communities. We'd like to think that we've come a long way since then, and made some great achievements in that time. A kilometre of new canal with towpaths, creating a safe new connection to Grangemouth

  • 27 kilometres of shared access, high quality pathways connecting 16 communities
  • A new lagoon in Helix Park
  • A new splash play area
  • Adventure Play Zone and Splash Play area
  • The Plaza Café
  • A new wetland boardwalk
  • The development of a 16-mile cycle route connecting The Helix, The Kelpies, The Falkirk Wheel and Callendar House.

Accordion Sample Description

Accordion Sample Description

The Forth and Clyde Canal is a canal opened in 1790, crossing central Scotland; it provided a route for the seagoing vessels of the day between the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde at the narrowest part of the Scottish Lowlands.

The Forth and Clyde Canal is 35 miles (56 km) long and it runs from the River Carron at Grangemouth to the River Clyde at Bowling, and had an important basin at Port Dundas in Glasgow.

Successful in its day, it suffered as the seagoing vessels were built larger and could no longer pass through. The railway age further impaired the success of the canal, and in the 1930s decline had ended in dormancy. The final decision to close the canal in the early 1960s was made due to maintenance costs of bridges crossing the canal exceeding the revenues it brought in. However, subsidies to the rail network were also a cause for its decline and the closure ended the movement of the east-coast Forth River fishing fleets across the country to fish the Irish Sea. The lack of political and financial foresight also removed a historical recreational waterway and potential future revenue generator to the town of Grangemouth. Unlike the majority of major canals the route through Grangemouth was drained and backfilled before 1967 to create a new carriageway for port traffic.

Seabegs Wood was the site of a Roman fortlet on the Antonine Wall in Scotland. At Seabegs, the outline of Antonine’s Wall, has lasted. Archaeologists from previous generations recorded this and stated that the ditch was deep and waterlogged.

This attractive woodland offers impressive views of the Antonine Wall ditch and rampart, and is also important as the site of a Roman fortlet.

It is also the best place to see the visible remains of the military way, the Roman road that connected all of the forts along the Antonine Wall. The military way is located about 30m south of the Antonine Wall rampart, and can be traced as a 7m-wide cambered mound with a visible road surface.

Seabegs Wood can be found 1m west of Bonnybridge on the B816 Castlecary to Bonnybridge road, just south of the forth and Clyde Canal. Access via a signposted track.

The Kelpies
The Kelpies are the largest equine sculptures in the world. Located between Falkirk and Grangemouth, it was created as a space for the communities in the Falkirk area to come together. The Kelpies go a step further in bringing together not only people from different parts of Scotland and the UK, but from all over the world.

Standing 30 metres (100ft) tall, The Kelpies stand majestically above all around them and pay homage to the working horses of Scotland which used to pull barges along Scotland’s canals and worked in the fields in the area where they now stand. Towering over a new canal extension which links the Forth & Clyde Canal to the North Sea, The Kelpies are the result of a unique collaboration between the partners and Glasgow-based artist Andy Scott. Almost a decade in the making, the project has transformed 350 hectares of underused land between Falkirk and Grangemouth into a vibrant parkland, visitor attraction and marine hub with the canal and The Kelpies at its heart.

Grab a bite to eat or a souvenir of your visit in the Horsebox, get up close with The Kelpies Tour, or enjoy all the activities The Helix has to offer.

The Falkirk Wheel
The Falkirk Wheel is a rotating boat lift in central Scotland, connecting the Forth and Clyde Canal with the Union Canal. The lift is named after Falkirk, the town in which it is located. It reconnects the two canals for the first time since the 1930s.

The Falkirk Wheel is the world’s only rotating boatlift, which is used to connect the Forth & Clyde and Union canals in central Scotland.

The Falkirk Wheel is a magnificent, mechanical marvel which has been constructed to 21st century, state-of-the-art engineering. It is already being recognised as an iconic landmark worthy of Scotland’s traditional engineering expertise.

Designed to replace a series of lock gates built in the 19th century – long since demolished and replaced by housing – The Falkirk Wheel is the showpiece of the Millennium Link project where coast-to-coast navigation of the canals has been re-established for the first time in over 40 years.

Rough Castle Fort
Rough Castle Fort is a Roman fort on the Antonine Wall roughly 2 kilometres south-east of Bonnybridge near Tamfourhill in the Falkirk council area, Scotland. It is owned by the National Trust for Scotland.

Antonine Wall, Rough Castle fort is the second smallest on the wall, however, it is easily the best-preserved and offers the most spectacular and memorable views of the surviving Roman remains. Here you can see an excellent example of the Antonine Wall ditch, the tallest-surviving portion of rampart, defensive lilia pits to the north of the wall, and easily identifiable fort and annexe defences, including multiple ditches and gateways. This is the best site to gain an impression of how the frontier and its integral forts worked.

Rough Castle is signposted at Bonnybridge, and then along a quiet side road from the B816 between Bonnybridge and High Bonnybridge. There is a small car park at the end of this road. Alternatively, park at the Falkirk Wheel, then follow the signposted path up from the visitor centre, a walk of about 15 minutes.

John Muir Way
The John Muir Way is a 215-kilometre continuous long distance route in southern Scotland, running from Helensburgh, Argyll and Bute in the west to Dunbar, East Lothian in the east.

The John Muir Way is a 215-kilometre (130 mi) continuous long distance route in southern Scotland, running from Helensburgh, Argyll and Bute in the west to Dunbar, East Lothian in the east. It is named in honour of the Scottish conservationist John Muir, who was born in Dunbar in 1838 and became a founder of the United States National Park Service. The route provides a coast-to-coast route across Scotland, linking Muir's birthplace with Scotland's first national park, Loch Lomond and The Trossachs, and Helensburgh, from where he left Scotland for the United States. It is suitable for walkers and cyclists.

The Helix
The Helix has been around since 2003, born from an idea to create a local greenspace that connects and engages with its local communities. We’d like to think that we’ve come a long way since then, and made some great achievements in that time. Take a look at some of our achievements below.

The Helix has been around since 2003, borne from an idea to create a local urban green space that connects and engages with its local communities. We'd like to think that we've come a long way since then, and made some great achievements in that time. A kilometre of new canal with towpaths, creating a safe new connection to Grangemouth

  • 27 kilometres of shared access, high quality pathways connecting 16 communities
  • A new lagoon in Helix Park
  • A new splash play area
  • Adventure Play Zone and Splash Play area
  • The Plaza Café
  • A new wetland boardwalk
  • The development of a 16-mile cycle route connecting The Helix, The Kelpies, The Falkirk Wheel and Callendar House.

Accordion Sample Description

Accordion Sample Description

Forth & Clyde Canal Network
The Forth and Clyde Canal is a canal opened in 1790, crossing central Scotland; it provided a route for the seagoing vessels of the day between the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde at the narrowest part of the Scottish Lowlands.

The Forth and Clyde Canal is 35 miles (56 km) long and it runs from the River Carron at Grangemouth to the River Clyde at Bowling, and had an important basin at Port Dundas in Glasgow.

Successful in its day, it suffered as the seagoing vessels were built larger and could no longer pass through. The railway age further impaired the success of the canal, and in the 1930s decline had ended in dormancy. The final decision to close the canal in the early 1960s was made due to maintenance costs of bridges crossing the canal exceeding the revenues it brought in. However, subsidies to the rail network were also a cause for its decline and the closure ended the movement of the east-coast Forth River fishing fleets across the country to fish the Irish Sea. The lack of political and financial foresight also removed a historical recreational waterway and potential future revenue generator to the town of Grangemouth. Unlike the majority of major canals the route through Grangemouth was drained and backfilled before 1967 to create a new carriageway for port traffic.

Seabegs Wood
Seabegs Wood was the site of a Roman fortlet on the Antonine Wall in Scotland. At Seabegs, the outline of Antonine’s Wall, has lasted. Archaeologists from previous generations recorded this and stated that the ditch was deep and waterlogged.

This attractive woodland offers impressive views of the Antonine Wall ditch and rampart, and is also important as the site of a Roman fortlet.

It is also the best place to see the visible remains of the military way, the Roman road that connected all of the forts along the Antonine Wall. The military way is located about 30m south of the Antonine Wall rampart, and can be traced as a 7m-wide cambered mound with a visible road surface.

Seabegs Wood can be found 1m west of Bonnybridge on the B816 Castlecary to Bonnybridge road, just south of the forth and Clyde Canal. Access via a signposted track.

SITE INFORMATION

Prices

Pitch + 2 adults  £15

Additional adult (16+) £2 / children free

** Open April – October **

HOW TO FIND US

Located in Longcroft, and only a 5 minute drive from the M80 motorway